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Iglu Meets Great Britain's Halfpipe Snowboarder Dom Harington

clock 1st November 2013 | comment0 Comments

With less than 100 days to the Sochi Winter Olympics, excitement builds up as the first ‘London Snow’ event and Slide2Sochi Roadshow hits Covent Garden. If you missed our previous news blog on the event you can read more here

Great Britain’s Halfpipe Snowboarder and Sochi 2014 hopeful Dom Harington was at the opening of London Snow and spoke to us about his journey to the Winter Olympics.

As the Slide 2 Sochi road show continues up and down the country, taster sessions were given on the 5 metre by 10 metre real slope by fully qualified instructors. Slide 2 Sochi has been set up to actively encourage people of all generations to get behind Great Britain’s winter sports athletes and participate in skiing and snowboarding ahead of Russia’s Winter Olympic Games in Sochi.

With the emergence of a new generation of talented athletes the wait could finally be over for Team GB winning an Olympic medal in Ski or Snowboarding. With aims high and Slopestlye making its debut at the Olympics, Great Britain also hopes to smash the previous record of 4 medals at the 2014 winter games.

Leading British Freeskiers and Snowboarders include:

  • Katie Summerhayes – Ski Slopestyle
  • James Woods – Ski Slopestyle
  • Jenny Jones – Snowboard Slopestyle
  • Billy Morgan – Snowboard Slopestyle

  • For more information view the Slide 2 Sochi Roadshow Events

    By Krystelle

    ‘Britain’s Fastest Snowboarder’ Jamie Barrow sets the World Indoor Snowboard Speed Record

    clock 9th July 2013 | comment0 Comments

    UK Snowboarder Jamie Barrow set the world indoor snowboard speed record at the weekend after reaching 69.4km/h at SnowWorld in Landgraaf.

    Back in April Jamie broke the British Snowboard Speed Record Record down the Mont Fort Speed Track in Verbier after clocking a huge 151.60km/h.

    Jamie chose to attempt this record at SnowWorld as it is the world’s biggest indoor snowdome with a massive 520 meter long slope.

    Jamie was overjoyed to have broke another record and afterwards said, “I’m really happy with the result and the opportunity to both train and set another record. This has given me even more confidence to push my limits and hopefully set more speed records in the future.”

    He added, “I hope this record will encourage others to attempt to beat it and go even faster. Without competition the sport wouldn't be where it is at the moment.”

    Lindsey Vonn To Take On The Boys

    clock 19th October 2012 | comment0 Comments
    Lindsey Vonn wants to enter the Men's Downhill in November next month, should she be aloud to compete against the boys? [More]

    Driving Miss Peisey

    clock 21st March 2012 | comment0 Comments

    Ever thought about driving to the Alps for your next ski trip, or are you a regular of the trip from Surrey to the Savoie?

    If you are indeed planning a skiing road trip then it's definitely worth taking some time-out to make sure you are up to date with the latest local laws, to avoid an untimely fine on your way to the mountains. But how many of you are aware of the intricacies of French law while travelling along their toll booth-filled roads?


    To help you prepare for a week on the slopes and to ensure your spending money is reserved for lift passes, local cheese and an après ski beer or two — as opposed to lining the pockets of the French motorway police — here are a few things to make sure you pack:

    Your Personal Breakdown Kit: You are probably already aware that driving regulations in France require every vehicle to carry a warning triangle and reflective jacket in case of an emergency. However daft you might feel getting your bright yellow jacket out on the hard shoulder, a fine will feel much worse.

    Snow Chains: Again, this may seem obvious, but cars driving on snow-covered roads must have snow chains fitted where roads signs to such effect are in place. On busy transfer days in the snow, the police will often be sat at the bottom of mountain roads, from Avoriaz to Val d'Isere, making sure everyone has snow chains before letting you go any further. There is also a 50 km/h (31 mph) speed limit when snow chains are in use — not that you'd want to drive any quicker then that with bits of metal wrapped around your tyres!

    Breathalysers: Yes, breathalysers. As of 1st July 2012 all drivers of any motor vehicle will be required to carry a disposable breathalyser in their vehicle. Failure to do so will result in a fine. As you may need to use one, it's recommended to stick two of them in your glove box for safe keeping. The breathalyser has to be certified by the French authorities showing an 'NF' number and they usually last for 12 months before going out of date.

    Radar & Speed Camera Detectors: Though radar detectors are still legal in the UK, as of 3rd January 2012 they have been outlawed in France. Anyone caught with a radar speed camera detector can be fined up to €1500 on the spot and their device will be taken away immediately — this includes satnavs that show the locations of speed cameras. According to the AA's guide on the matter, you should be able to disable this function from your device and if you contact the manufacturer there may be a software update that removes the locations of speed cameras in France. Either that, or leave the satnav at home and rely on your trusty old maps.

    Speeding: Speed limits in France are affected by both where you are, what you are driving and the weather. Standard speed limits for cars are easily seen with road signs, but during high-winds, rain and snow these all drop. For example, the speed limit on the motorway is 130km/h, which is reduced to 110 km/h in the rain. Note: Holders of EU driving licence — if caught driving more than 40 km/h above the speed limit — will have their licence confiscated on the spot by the police. For more info on speed limits in France, take a look at the AA's France Touring Tips.

    Tolls: As you are probably aware, the French motorways and duel-carriageways are all tolled in France. The advantage is no road tax, the disadvantage is the need to stop and pay the fees every so often. You can now purchase the Liber-t toll tag, which allows you to effectively jump the queue buy using the automated tolls, as opposed to paying each time. The set-up cost is around €40, of which €20 is a refundable deposit. If you are on a long journey, to say Val d'Isere, the €20 cost will easily be worth the savings in time and the possible fuel costs caused by sitting in queues when the traffic is busy. I know us Brits love to queue, but there nothing wrong with joining the quicker, more organised and efficient queue — in fact, that is the British way to queue. These can be purchased on the Sanef Tolling website, where more information on the costs and how they work can be found.

    Driving to France can be a great way of travelling to your skiing holiday, whether on a cheeky weekend away or for a full-blown family holiday. Just make sure the experience makes your holiday easier, as opposed to a hassle. Remember, French police will take no encouraging to fine you, so be prepared.

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