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Scotty's Guide To Skiing Bumps

clock 19th May 2011 | comment0 Comments

Iglu ski expert and former Veriber ski instructor, Scotty, takes us through his guide to bumps, offering tips and advice in preparation for taking on the likes of Val d'Isere's Le Face, Avoriaz's Swiss Wall and Verbier's Chasseure.

Skiing bumps is, without doubt, challenging — some are attracted to that challenge, though many prefer to just find an alternative route. They are like Marmite, you love them or hate them.

For those that feel the love, would like to some understanding, or to be inspired here you go.

Firstly mind, then body.

Mind

  • When standing at the top you'll need to take a deep breath and stay calm.
  • Choose your route carefully, there will be an easy way down vs a route with bigger bumps, a steeper gradient, or generally more awkward — you choose.
  • The bumps may be soft or hard, look for clues — are they icy or powder?
  • Have they formed in a predictable grid or not?
  • Mental speed — you're going to have to make quick decisions, there's no time for faffing.
  • If you get spat out, stop... get your breath back... refocus and keep going, don't be a quitter!
  • Look ahead — your goal should be to look three bumps ahead, start off with one then two and work towards three — you've already decided what you're going to do on the bump that you're on!
  • Make sure you're heading to the next bump at the best angle.

Body and Posture

  • Arms forward and no leaning back. If you lean back you'll find that your body frame will be rigid and you need to be attacking moguls in a confident forward position.
  • Your upper body needs to be calm, let your legs do the work. Upper body calm, legs flexible is very important.
  • You need to be fit, this is a high impact and endurance activity! Running, sit ups and cross trainer are all good — smokers will struggle.
  • Let your legs do the work, if your upper body is moving around your head will also be bouncing about. It's very hard to see where you're going if your head doesn't stay level.
  • Use pole plants for timing.

Here's the Technical bit

Absorb vs extending

Practice traversing across the ski field. Low speed, keep your upper body still and let your legs move up then let them fall down as you go over each bump, keep your arms out and forward, in the goal keeper position. Try both directions so you get a feel for each leg being low & high on the slope.

Absorbing: Normally done at the start of the bump. Hit the bump like you're skidding to a stop, when you hit the bump you can let your knees buckle up to your chest and by absorbing you, you can maintain your speed — plus you'll have a smooth transition over the bump. Pushing your feet against the bump will enable you to slow down.

Extension: As you come up to a bump it's possible to extend your legs rather than absorb. This will project you up in the air. The amount you do this depends on the speed that you're going and the steepness of the bump. If you do this it's possible jump over a following, awkward bump.

Turning on a bump

So, you've hit the bump! As you ride over, your tips will be pointing out in the air, your foot and the tail end of your ski will still be resting on the bump. You'll reach a pivot point, pole plant, rotate your skis and scrape the other side of the bump like you're grating cheese. This will also help you control speed.

Control is key, if you feel like you're out of control then slow down! If you're out of your depth, find an exit and join the piste. Start off with hero moguls — small bumps where you can't fail to look good.

Technique: It's hard to teach via the written word, so instruction in resort is recommended. You need to be able to feel and see the same as what the instructor is seeing and feeling. Every mogul is different.

Avoid: South facing monsters — if the ski field goes through regular daytime melt and night time refreeze [freeze-thaw conditions - Ed] the moguls are likely going to be hard under the foot. It's often a one way ticket you'll just have to endure untill the end, unless you find an escape route(!), a compulsory foot massage will be needed at the end of the day.

If you're feeling confident and you're coming up to a long, oval shaped mogul it's possible to rotate your skis 90% and grind across the top of the mogul with just the middle of your ski. You'll find the tip and tail of your ski in the air at this point and you'll kill your speed so remember to rotate your skis back to facing down hill or you'll come a cropper.

Get creative, use the mountain... there's more than one way down.... choose the cool one.

Goals

Can you get from the top to bottom in one hit? Three Tortins [Scotty's favourite run in Verbier - Ed] a day, keep the doctor away. Can you beat your mate? Can you get down a single channel? Zig zagging across the mountain is cheating a bit. Can you fit in a few tricks on the way? There's always time for that!

Make sure you don't get yourself down, most people find bumps a challenge.

Two Important Points

Safety: If the terrain is too steep for you then don't do it! Start off on slopes that you feel most comfortable on and work your way up. Bank it for another day... something for you to look forward to.

Most ski schools will offer a ski bumps clinic, though you may have to shop around to find a keen instructor. Most instructors have a disliking for bumps too.

Enjoy yourself: It's supposed to be fun, if you don't like them then try carving, cruising around the rest of the resort or sitting in a restaurant having a long lunch . If you're skiing with a friend or partner don't make them do bump skiing, you may find that your relationship will come to an abrupt end! Just meet them at the bottom and let them choose a route down they're happy with on the Piste.



Calling All Half Term Skiers

clock 4th May 2011 | comment0 Comments

As we all know, skiing over February half term is one of the most costly weeks of the season. Along with New Year, half term is the most popular week for people to hit the slopes.

With the early deals for next winter hitting the shelves we were surprised to see the incredible offers available for Club Med's all-inclusive hotels in the Alps. Having done a quick comparison with some popular chalet/club hotels in the same resorts I felt the need to spread the word. With prices from £4300 for a family of four — including all your food, drink (except super-premium brands and champers), flights, transfers, lift passes, tuition, kids club and twin rooms — during half term, you'll be hard pressed to find anything comparable.

All-inclusive ski holidays have become increasingly popular with the Brits thanks to Club Med's great value and service. Okay, so they are very French, from the food to the entertainment, but people are realising the great value they offer and are going back. Plus, some dodgy French entertainment always goes down well after a day on the slopes and having enjoyed the complimentary drinks at the bar.

Though the staff and instructors are all French speaking there are plenty of English speakers on hand. The lessons are often bilingual, though on busy weeks, English speaking lessons are often offered. The food is always buffet-style, but is of a great standard and local specialties such as Tartiflette, Fondue and Raclette can be found during a week's stay — you can't beat some melted cheese with a glass of wine over lunch.

I've picked three family Club Meds and two chalet hotels as comparisons, and on the off chance you are a half term skier looking to escape small children, an adult only hotel.

All the price comparisons are based on Gatwick flights, transfers, twin rooms and two adults travelling with two 11 year old children. I have factored in the standard prices of the chalet/club hotels and all the extras that Club Med offer, to give a real comparison.

Val d'Isere

The first thing that caught my eye was the Club Med Val d'Isere, one of the most famous resorts in the world and definitely among the elite in terms of mountain, snow and resort. The Club Med hotel here has enjoyed a recent overhaul and sits in a great location, you can ski the whole of the Espace Killy, and should you not want to ski back into Val for lunch you can stop off at the Club Med in Tignes for lunch or even just a drink in their sun terrace.

The Club Med Val d'Isere is a 4* property so I am comparing it with the 4* Chalethotel Le Val d'Isere, operated with one of our top family specialists. Club Med are coming in at £5,484 for a family of four for their full, all-inclusive package. The Chalethotel Le Val d'Isere on chalet board, with flights and transfers is £6,960, and by the time you add in lift passes for the family you are looking at £7,440. That's up to £1,960 more, and you don't get an all-inclusive bar or lunch! The one problem with Club Med Val d'Isere is the lack of mini-club and kids' ski lessons, though it still represents better value than the chalthotel.

Cervinia

Another great, snow sure resort offering a great deal for Feb half term is Club Med Cervinia. Though this comparison is a little off that is because there wasn't a direct comparison. The Club Med Cervinia is a 4* hotel and has a mountain restaurant, where you can enjoy your all-inclusive lunches and regular drink intake — obviously we are referring to responsible drinking rather than for fun.

The Clubhotel Petit Palais is a 3* hotel, offering clubhotel board and twin rooms. Both properties enjoy a similar location, as you can ski back to the Club Med and within 50m of the Petit Palais. Though the Club Med offer a shuttle service to the slopes, whereas it is a ten minute walk for the Petit Palais. The all-inclusive price, this time with much sought after interconnecting twins (standard twins are a little bit less), the price for a family of 4 is £6,398. Whereas the Petit Palais price is, this time less, at £4,248 and with lift passes & tuition for £5,652. This time the price is £746 less (£180 pp), though this doesn't include, childcare your lunches, all your drinks and a free shuttle bus, so the price once you are in resort will be similar, without needing to carry your wallet.

Les Arcs

Les Arcs has a great selection of chalets, hotels and apartments, but the main comparisons here would be the other Club Med hotels, so this is just a quick snippet of the best deal out there. Les Arcs has superb skiing and the Club Med Arc Extreme is at 2000m — plus you get all the usual trimmings (again ski school for under 12s is not included). The 3* hotel here is amazing value at £4,340, which is only £1,085 per person for the most popular week of the season. A 3* with lift pass here will cost you more!

Child Free Half Term Haven

Not everyone who has to, or chooses, to ski during half term wants or needs family hotels or chalets. Some people like to escape to more grown-up environments, yet still want great value and great skiing. Well, thanks again to Club Med Val Thorens, you can. Twin rooms here, with a Three Valley lift pass, all the beer, wine and great food you need and the added bonus of no children is only £2,282, which is a measly £1,141 pp.

Club Med isn't for everyone, some people like to fill a chalet with friends and family — which I agree is great fun — others love grand hotels, or cheap and cheerful apartments. For great value family holidays, escaping with the other half and with friends, Club Med is fantastic and I've always had a great experience. So if you can handle the French, the great food and the world class skiing, I would book a Club Med before they sell out — and probably the Val d'Isere offer!

 



Igluski's Top Resorts To Avoid The Queues

clock 23rd February 2011 | comment0 Comments

Not Everyone likes the hustle and bustle of resorts like Val d'Isere, Meribel or St. Anton, some people prefer a more relaxed affair yet still want great skiing, so where to go?

With this is mind I had a word with a few of Igluski's resort experts to get the lowdown on how to avoid queues, packed out restaurants and crowded pistes. The team appear to have skied every major resort and many hidden gems, so after banging some heads together here are our Top Resorts To Avoid the Queues.

The French Resistance

France is by far the most popular destination for British skiers, with the big three ski areas — the Espace Killy, Three Valleys and Paradiski accounting for 41%* of British ski holidays. That at least gives us a starting point: for world class, vibrant resorts that cater for everyone then head to the Espace Killy, Three Valleys or Paradiski, but for a more relaxed, less hectic week on the slopes where jumps to mind?

Back in the '60s Megève was the height of chic winter holiday destinations, with a stunning village and a boutique feel. Today it still offers a fantastic ambience and great skiing and the crowds have moved on to the trendier Tarantaise resorts. So for chic, boutique elegance head to Megève.

Montgenèvre is a picturesque alpine village that sits on the French-Italian border. Accessing the Milky Way it offers a huge ski area, yet being among the southern French resorts it has become a forgotten gem. Think families, cheese and vin chaud on a calm sun terrace after a great day on the mountain.

Intimate Italy

Italy has long been home to some of the best value skiing in Europe, both the Milky Way and the Super Dolomiti ski domains offer huge ski areas, Cervinia is linked with the ever popular Zermatt and from La Thuile you can ski over to La Rosiere in France's Tarantaise Valley. But these resorts, are, well, very popular and therefore not what you are after.

There are some hidden gems in the Dolomites but if you head to the lesser known resorts of Gressoney & Champoluc you can enjoy the flattering skiing underneath Europe's second largest mountain, Monte Rosé. The resorts are in the beautiful Gressoney Valley and the former hot-spots now offer a more serene family experience than the espresso-fuelled fun of Passo Tonale.

The Jung Swiss

Switzerland is renowned for beautiful, charming, chocolate box resorts. It is known for great skiing, glaciers, cheese and chocolate. It is also offers some of the world's most exclusive and famous resorts, just think of St. Moritz, Davos, Klosters and Zermatt. But Switzerland also offers some stunning, quiet resorts with incredible skiing and minimal crowds.

The Jungfrau region must be one of the most stunning ski-able valleys in the world. From the resorts of Mürren & Grindelwald you can enjoy one of the most picturesque train rides to resort, taking in the Eiger, Mönch and the Jungfrau. Mürren is know for its steeps and the legendary 'Inferno' run, whereas Grindelwald offers great cruising and awe-inspiring views.

Angelic Austria

Austria is a place of split personality, on the one hand you have the famous raucous après ski — from St. Anton's Mooserwirt and Krazy Kanguruh, to the champagne bars of Ischgl & Lech, on the other hand you have the great family skiing on offer in Zell am See, Kaprun and Kitzbühel. Both these personalities offer great holidays, depending on your taste, though they are not far enough from the beaten track for some.

One of Austria's most enchanting resorts, Alpbach, is often forgotten, due to it's smaller ski area, but shouldn't be discounted. The beautiful, traditional village has 52km of piste with 1500m of vertical drop and there are plenty of resorts with less vertical, less pistes and are far less attractive that we visit each year (think Bulgarian resorts for a start). Alpbach offers a charming village, perfect for families on their first trip together or those who enjoy skiing in a more intimate resort.

Now Obergurgl may not be the most attractive of Austria's resorts, but the purpose built village sits at the bottom of a glacier and the combination of great intermediate skiing and a limited amount of accommodation means less lift queues than its surrounding resorts. Linked to Hochgurgl it offers a decent sized ski area and a calm family atmosphere.

British Canada

Well technically it's British Columbia, but the Canadian province offers some of the finest powder and most famous resorts in the world. You could head to Whistler for the holiday of a lifetime, but being one of the top resorts in the world draws in the crowds.

Head a little further north into Interior B.C. and visit the powder haven of Big White. The name says it all really, the resort regularly receives somewhere around 9m of snow a season, so powder skiing is part of everyday life there. The resort boasts (quietly of course) one of Canada's largest ski areas, fluffy, dry, powder and saloon-style, wooden-clad, gold-rush charm.

Heading inland toward Banff National Park you stumble across the resort of Revelstoke. This is one of Canada's newer resorts, where huge investment has been put into the area in recent years. Revelstoke boasts the status of being the only resort that offers piste, cat and heli-skiing all under one umbrella. This may be an escape for the more advanced skiers and snowboarders among us, but it oozes mountain charm without the queues — especially when you're being taken from spot-to-spot on the back of a snowcat.

Mid-West America

The American Mid-West is home to some of the United States' finest skiing, from the world class resorts of Aspen, Breckenridge and Vail to the deep, dry powder, and perfect pistes, parks & lifts. The celebrity filled resorts come at a price and are very popular, yet there are again some forgotten gems to discover.

Beaver Creek is the luxury resort on offer, much like Megève it offers a stunning setting, great hotels and a real feel of elegance. The resort could happily compete with its busier neighbours but chooses not to. This calmer mountain and luxury accommodation are the perfect escape for those looking for a great holiday away from the crowds and are happy to pay the price.

Heading a little further west into Utah is Park City, famous for the Sundance Film Festival and boasts three mountains — including the skier only Deer Valley. The resort has a real American-West feel to it, Park City also boasts its own distillery (which will banish those no alcohol rumours) and some superb skiing.

We all love something different about skiing, I swear by Meribel and Morzine, our Sales Manager is St. Anton through and through and of course there are the Val d'Isere, Whistler and Les Arcs fans among us. The great thing about skiing is there is a mountain, resort or even hotel/chalet to suit all of us. I love chalets, big mountains, fun atmosphere and après ski, others prefer charming villages, family run hotels and understated elegance. They key is to find your own spiritual home in the mountains.

* Stats taken from Igluski 2010/11 bookings



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